All-acrylic binder. The binder is what holds the pigments, mildewcides and other solids that form the actual paint film. Look for latex paint with an all-acrylic binder, which is inherently more weather resistant than vinyl or vinyl-acrylic. Many paint companies use a modified acrylic for their interior lines and all-acrylic for premium exterior paints made to endure the elements. For example, Glidden's Spred Satin is an interior with a modified acrylic, while its Spred Dura Satin is an exterior paint with an all acrylic binder. If you don't see "100% Acrylic" or "All Acrylic" in bold on the front of the can, check ingredients for "acrylic polymer." Also be sure you pick the right paint for the surface you're covering. Most water-based exterior paints can be used on wood and hardboard siding and trim. They're also fine for vinyl and aluminum siding, and most masonry. On stucco prone to cracking, use an elastomeric paint. It's more flexible than standard coatings and leaves a durable film that's twice as thick (about 5 mil). An example is the stucco paint from Valspar, which bridges hairline cracks to keep out water. You can also buy paint tailored to conditions in specific regions of the country. Dutch Boy's ClimateGuard line was the first of these paints from a major manufacturer. For example, its Southeast formulation has extra mildewcides for a humid climate, while Northwest paint is higher in solids to resist months of rainfall.
John Fazzolari is a contractor, so when it comes to color schemes, he knows whereof he speaks. His article on color selection relies in part on amusing anecdotes, some of which are cautionary tales, to make his well-considered points. (The “Smurf Blue” story is particularly memorable.) This piece may not be as systematic as the others on this list, but the conversational tone and common-sense advice (look around your neighborhood for exterior colors you like, then knock on some doors) make this a quick, fun read.
Did you even read the article? It was specifying UNSCRUPULOUS painters! And, by the way, the photo at the top was not identified at all. How would anyone know whether it was done by a homeowner or not? Also did you ever stop to think that if a consumer has the knowlege to spot a dishonest contractor then by default he also has the knowlege to identify an honest one as well? And, pardon me, but just because you've never seen something has absolutely nothing to do with whether it has actually happened to someone else. Why would any honest business person be so defensive about the publishing of such useful information? If any painters/painting contractors object to a consumer having this kind of information maybe they are the dishonest ones!
Calculate your costs.Having an idea of the cost of paint you need to purchase will help obtain quotes from a contractor. “Paint coverage is based on how many square feet of surface one gallon will cover,” says Bunting. “Most paints will cover approximately 400 square feet. Tally this by multiplying in feet the wall’s height by its width, minus windows and doors.” Determine how much paint is needed to complete the project. “To calculate the cost of a project, factor in the day rates, the size of the property, any architectural features, and the paint finish needed,” says Rance.
Freshly painted walls often look blotchy. The color is uniform, but the sheen isn’t consistent. This usually occurs over the holes and cracks you patched with a filler or drywall compound. The porous fillers absorb the paint, dulling the surface (a problem called “flashing”). When light hits these dull spots, they stick out like a sore thumb. The smooth patch also stands out in contrast to the slightly bumpy texture of the rest of the wall. A quick coat of primer is all it takes to eliminate flashing and texture differences.
Before the scrubdown, protect nearby plants by misting their leaves and saturating the surrounding soil with water, pulling them away from the house, and shrouding them in fabric drop cloths. (Plants will cook under plastic.) Lay more drop cloths along the base of the walls to collect any falling paint debris. Walls should be wet down before getting scrubbed, then washed with a gallon of water mixed with 1 cup chlorine bleach and 1 cup of either a concentrated, phosphate-free cleaner, such as a trisodium phosphate (TSP) substitute, or Jomax House Cleaner. Working in sections, from the bottom to the top, will avoid streaks. Be sure to rinse walls well before the solution dries. Wood siding and trim should be ready to paint after a day or two of dry weather. 

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Is there damage to your ceiling?  Do you need to repair and re-texture a section to blend with your old ceiling?  We can help in making new repaired ceilings blend with your old texture or we can create a new texture for your entire ceiling.  Many painting companies stay away from this kind of repair as it is not easy to do and takes years of experimenting to learn the art of blending textured ceilings. We can also repaint your entire ceiling with a professional spray finish- making them look new again. Cigarette smoke damage and yellowing of ceilings is a common problem we come across. It’s important to know that there are strategic steps to follow to completely get rid of that yellow tinge in your ceilings. That is why you can feel confident choosing Weiler Painting.

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The Painter Guide was created by Eric Barstow of PaintingBusinessPro.com and Chandler Zieg of PaintingLeads.com. We come from a vast background in house painting. Our national painting company produces over $4 million in revenue each year and our education and advertising service for painters sells over $1.5 million per year. We’ve literally helped thousands of painters grow their businesses.
I'm an architect and my firm routinely specifies interior finishes for projects so I thought I'd contribute a professional's perspective on the issue of how many coats of paint are deemed "acceptable". The fact of the matter is the average consumer usually isn't a paint expert and can't be expected to know about all the factors that impact coverage. That knowledge is considered "means and methods" and in a court of law, the responsibility lies with the painter or general contractor, not the consumer. What the consumer should be concerned about is the final result-does it look good and is it what you expected? The simplest way to communicate this to your painter is to stipule in your written agreement that the number of coats will be "as required to cover". That way all the guess work about what kind of primer, how many coats, how color affects the scope of work, etc., is removed from the consumer's responsibility and resides where it belongs-with the professional. In the contract that's why retention is always a good idea-typically 10% is withheld from payment until the job is completed to the satisfaction of the customer. Of course in return you as the customer have to be reasonable about what constitutes a completed job. Just my $.02.
so what about hardwood chamfer boards? Specially the common post war 60-70mm chamfer boards. The old paint peels, so the painter sanded it back to bare timber, primed it with water based timber primer,and finished with exterior paint. After about 1 month, the paint had bubbled where the sun hits it most. The painter was advised to use an oil based primer, and the same thing happened. Talking with other painters, they said this is a common issue, and it is not a paint issue, it’s more to do with the timber.

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State your expectations. The number of coats a painter applies isn’t the only factor in determining the quality—and price—of the project. Preparation is also key. If you want a surface that’s free of unevenness from past paint jobs, tell the contractors—and be prepared to pay extra. But if you can live with some imperfections, agree on what level of prep is acceptable and what isn’t.

how much does a paint contractor charge

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