When the primer is dry, caulk all small joints (less than ¼-inch-wide) in the siding and trim. Most pros use siliconized acrylics—paint won't stick to straight silicones—but Guertin and O'Neil like the new, more expensive urethane acrylics for their greater flexibility and longevity. O'Neil stresses that it's shortsighted to skimp on caulk. "If the joint fails, you're back to square one." Guertin uses the lifetime rating as his quality guide. "I don't expect 35-year caulk will last 35 years, but it should last longer than a 15-year caulk."
Painters Supply & Equipment Co. has been a leading Automotive and Specialty Coatings Distributor since 1952 and has grown to be one of the nation’s premier suppliers of Automotive, Industrial, Fleet and Architectural coatings and associated products.  Painters Supply continues to provide leading-industry sales, service and support that has led to the elite status of “PPG Platinum Distributor.” PPG, one the world’s leading manufacturers of automotive and commercial coatings, relies extensively on Painters Supply and the Platinum network to provide certified technical training and best-in-class support to the refinish and commercials markets.  Painters Supply has been awarded the PPG’s prestigious Distributor of the Year designation multiple times over the last 25 years, and recognizes the Painters Supply organization as the leading PPG Distributor in North American based on growth, customer service, industry training and support initiatives.
So why not just paint your own home. I'm not a painter, so my wife and I take our time, buying the paint and supplies, and doing our own painting. Yes, we need to tape, and it's not perfect, but we get the satisfaction of seeing our completed work. Get the supplies, sliders for your furniture, and patience and go for it. That way YOU have control over the entire project.

exterior house painting cost per square foot


Painters Supply & Equipment Co. has been a leading Automotive and Specialty Coatings Distributor since 1952 and has grown to be one of the nation’s premier suppliers of Automotive, Industrial, Fleet and Architectural coatings and associated products.  Painters Supply continues to provide leading-industry sales, service and support that has led to the elite status of “PPG Platinum Distributor.” PPG, one the world’s leading manufacturers of automotive and commercial coatings, relies extensively on Painters Supply and the Platinum network to provide certified technical training and best-in-class support to the refinish and commercials markets.  Painters Supply has been awarded the PPG’s prestigious Distributor of the Year designation multiple times over the last 25 years, and recognizes the Painters Supply organization as the leading PPG Distributor in North American based on growth, customer service, industry training and support initiatives.

For interior paint I prefer the semi-gloss, provides a very subtle sheen and is super easy to clean -no flaking, chipping, etc. I've painted a lot, and found that Sherwin Williams Ovation paint has been the easiest to use, and provides the best coverage. I even painted my ceilings with it and WOW! I was done it no time at all, with perfect coverage.

Safest way to ensure that everything is fair is to get it ALL in writing , signed by both parties. Specify each item that needs repair. Also, BUY the paint YOURSELF. That way, there is no incentive to water it down, and you KNOW that you are getting the grade/quality you actually purchased. Don't be penny wise and pound foolish; if you are paying to hire a painter, buy the best paint that you can afford, to ensure maximum life of this home improvement.


Turn your paintbrush into big profits. Whether you own a paint contracting business or you're ready to start one up, Paint Contractor's Complete Handbook, by Dennis D. Gleason, will help make the difference between flat growth and a glossy profit picture. From bidding on jobs to estimating wallcovering, this business-building advisor helps you make profitable decision on costs, materials, equipment and prep work for any type of job - repaint work, new construction, commercial and industrial projects, even government contracts. You'll see how to prepare winning bids...promote and market your services...estimate labor, equipment, overhead and profit...prevent legal disputes...read blueprints...select the right materials...and much, much more.
I'm an architect and my firm routinely specifies interior finishes for projects so I thought I'd contribute a professional's perspective on the issue of how many coats of paint are deemed "acceptable". The fact of the matter is the average consumer usually isn't a paint expert and can't be expected to know about all the factors that impact coverage. That knowledge is considered "means and methods" and in a court of law, the responsibility lies with the painter or general contractor, not the consumer. What the consumer should be concerned about is the final result-does it look good and is it what you expected? The simplest way to communicate this to your painter is to stipule in your written agreement that the number of coats will be "as required to cover". That way all the guess work about what kind of primer, how many coats, how color affects the scope of work, etc., is removed from the consumer's responsibility and resides where it belongs-with the professional. In the contract that's why retention is always a good idea-typically 10% is withheld from payment until the job is completed to the satisfaction of the customer. Of course in return you as the customer have to be reasonable about what constitutes a completed job. Just my $.02.
The other difficult part is getting a painting contractor to show up. While this generalization does not apply to every painter, personally I am extremely grateful if I can get a paint contractor to show up to look at the house and to later produce a written estimate. I hardly fault the painting contractors, because I think it is a combination of the contractors being smaller operations along with a high demand for their work.
Paint will be your next-biggest cost, at anywhere from $20 to $70 or more per gallon, depending on the sheen, the grade you’ve chosen and any special features. Some paints, for instance, are mold resistant. Others suppress smells or require fewer coats. Some have a lifetime warranty. Paints with warranties, however, may not be worth a higher price. In Consumer Reports tests approximating nine years of wear, only a few exterior paints and stains with lifetime warranties held up well. But “you’ll grow tired of the color long before a good-quality paint wears out,” Bancroft says.

how much are house painters

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